Course Location

 

Target Audience

Physicians and other medical professionals who engage in wilderness activities, who counsel individuals who take part in such activities, or who are likely to encounter illness or injury in remote or resource-limited settings.

 

CME Information

The Wilderness Medical Society designates this educational activity for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

8 California Continuing Education credits are available for Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics.

Wapta / Yoho Ski Traverse with CME Credit

This is a variation of the famous Wapta Traverse, which utilizes the new Guy Hut on the Des Poilus Glacier. Traverse an icefield, climb a peak or two, ski some great lines, and earn CME credits. Stay safe with an ACMG certified guide and learn wilderness medicine from a Tahoe Wilderness Medicine instructor.

We start with a warm up day, skiing up to the comfortable Bow Hut. This gives us time to sort out equipment and get used to our 15 kg packs. All we need to bring are a sleeping bag and our food.

Our days are spent traversing glaciers and icefields. Expect four to six hours travel time on each day. If we have the energy we may be able to go for a run once we get to the next hut, or perhaps we will ski up a peak along the way!

You have the ability to enjoy this classic Canadian ski traverse if:

  • You are a strong skier (can ski a black diamond run at a ski hill)
  • Have done some ski touring
  • Have a regular fitness routine

The huts have pretty much everything we need for a comfortable stay. The first night is at Bow Hut, the second at the new, state-of-the-art Guy Hut, and then on the last night we stay at the historic Stanley Mitchell Hut in the Little Yolo Valley. Finally, we exit via the scenic Iceline route to Emerald Lake.

Learn practical wilderness medicine skills in an outdoor environment

Through lectures, hands-on sessions, and scenarios, you will enhance your medical training and learn to apply your medical knowledge to the winter outdoor environment.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

  • Acute Mountain Sickness
  • Hypothermia
  • Ski and Snowboard Injury Patterns
  • Avalanche Resuscitation
  • Frostbite
  • Fractures and Dislocations in the the Wilderness
  • Wilderness Medical Kits
  • Pre-hospital Patient Assessment and Care in the Wilderness
  • Wilderness Rescue for the Backcountry Traveler
  • Avalanche Rescue
  • Avalanche Case Scenarios

Educational Objectives

After attending this conference, the participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate increased awareness of medical problems unique to the wilderness and austere environments
  • Prevent, diagnose and manage illnesses or injuries in the wilderness and/or remote location
  • Promote increased awareness of safety and accident prevention in wilderness surroundings

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the Wilderness Medical Society and Tahoe Wilderness Medicine, LLC. The Wilderness Medical Society is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 

Tahoe Wilderness Medicine, LLC reserves the right to change or substitute course faculty without advance or prior notice to participants.

Faculty

Josh Dubansky
MD, DiMM
Josh Dubansky's picture
Josh Dubansky is a board certified emergency medicine physician at a busy tertiary care and trauma center, and is Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Nevada School of Medicine (UNSOM). Dr. Dubansky received his medical degree from the University of Maryland, then trained in Emergency Medicine at UCSF-Fresno. There, he created and completed an Area of Concentration in Wilderness Medical Education, designed and implemented EMS field scenarios and mass casualty drills, and lectured extensively to medical students, EMTs, nurses, physicians, and National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service Rangers, and researched and wrote National Park Service EMS protocols as part of the ParkMedic and Wilderness Medicine Programs. He also helped design and implement a Tactical Medicine program for the U.S. Forest Service. Dr. Dubansky has taught for or helped run numerous outdoor programs, including NOLS, Cal Adventures at U.C. Berkeley, Cornell University Outdoor Education, California Canoe and Kayak, ARTA River Trips, Healing Waters San Francisco, and Boardsports Kiteboarding. He also spends time as a ski clinic physician and as a National Ski Patrol volunteer physician. He is a Wilderness Medical Society Fellowship Candidate and WMS DiMM Graduate.

Faculty Disclosure

It is the policy of Tahoe Wilderness Medicine, LLC to disclose real or apparent conflicts of interest of faculty members related to the content of their presentation to participants to help the participants form their own judgment about the presentation.